Category Archives: exoplanets

Amaury Triaud wins the RAS Fowler Award

Congratulations to Dr Amaury Triaud, now at the University of Birmingham, recipient of the 2020 Fowler Award from the Royal Astronomical Society. The Fowler Award is for scientists making a “particularly noteworthy contribution to Astronomy & Geophysics at an early stage of their research career”.

Amaury Triaud

The citation reads: “Between 2007 and 2017, Dr Triaud led the radial-velocity follow-up of planet candidates south of declination −10 degrees from the Wide-Angle Search for Planets (WASP). His programme led to the discovery of over 130 planets from some 1000 candidates, making WASP the most successful of all ground-based transit searches.”

Amaury started looking for WASP exoplanets as a graduate student at the Geneva Observatory, under the direction of Didier Queloz (himself recipient of the 2019 Nobel Prize for Physics for his discoveries of exoplanets). Didier’s group at Geneva operated the CORALIE spectrograph on the 1.2-m Euler telescope at La Silla in Chile. Euler/CORALIE was the ideal follow-up instrument to vet the transiting exoplanet candidates coming from WASP-South, able to show which ones were genuinely the transits of planetary-mass bodies (only 1-in-10 of all candidates), and which were merely transit mimics. Amaury organised and ran the campaign, observing of order 1500 candidates and leading to the discovery of around 150 planets.

Euler telescope

The Euler 1.2-m telescope

While the citation mentions the campaign for Southern candidates south of declination −10 degrees, the Geneva group were also responsible for much of the follow-up in the equatorial strip from −10 to +10 degrees, where the candidates came jointly from data from WASP-South and from SuperWASP-North on La Palma.

Amaury’s work extended into studying the orbits of the WASP exoplanets, showing that many of the orbits were misaligned. He also developed programs identifying and studying the low-mass binary stars that also came from the WASP survey, and is now looking for circumbinary planets orbiting these low-mass binaries.

The IAU announces names for WASP exoplanets

The IAU have recently announced the outcome of their campaign allowing the people of the world to name recently discovered exoplanets and their host stars. The names chosen for WASP exoplanet systems are:

WASP-6 and WASP-6b: Márohu and Boinayel (Márohu and Boinayel are the god of drought and the god of rain, respectively, from the mythology of the Taino people of the Dominican Republic).

WASP-13 and WASP-13b: Gloas and Cruinlagh (in Manx Gaelic, Gloas means to shine, like a star, while Cruinlagh means to orbit).

WASP-15 and WASP-15b: Nyamien and Asye (Nyamien is the supreme creator deity in the Akan mythology of the Ivory Coast, while Asye is the Earth goddess).

WASP-17 and WASP-17b: Dìwö and Ditsö̀ (from the Bribri language of Costa Rica, Dìwö means the Sun, while Ditsö̀ is the name the god Sibö̀ gave to the Bribri people).

WASP-21 and WASP-21b: Tangra and Bendida (Tangra is the supreme creator god in early Bulgarian mythology, while Bendida is the Great Mother goddess of the Thracians).

WASP-22 and WASP-22b: Tojil and Koyopa’ (Tojil is a Mayan deity related to rain, storms and fire, while Koyopa’ means lightning in the K’iche’ Mayan language).

WASP-34 and WASP-34b: Amansinaya and Haik (Aman Sinaya is the primordial deity of the ocean in the Philippine’s Tagalog mythology while Haik succeeded Aman Sinaya as God of the Sea).

WASP-38 and WASP-38b: Irena and Iztok (Iztok and Irena are characters from a traditional story from Slovenia).

WASP-39 and WASP-39b: Malmok and Bocaprins (Malmok and Boca Prins are scenic, sandy beaches in Aruba).

WASP-50 and WASP-50b: Chaophraya and Maeping (Chao Phraya is the great river of Thailand, while Mae Ping is a tributary).

WASP-52 and WASP-52b: Anadolu and Göktürk (Anadolu is the motherland of the Turkish people while Göktürk was the first Turkish state, established in the 5th century).

WASP-60 and WASP-60b: Morava and Vlasina (Morava is the longest river in Serbia, while Vlasina is a tributary).

WASP-62 and WASP-62b: Naledi and Krotoa (Naledi means “star” in the Sesotho, SeTswana and SePedi languages of South Africa, while Krotoa is considered the Mother of Africa and member of the Khoi people).

WASP-64 and WASP-64b: Atakoraka and Agouto (Atakoraka is a mountain range in Togo, while Agouto is the highest peak).

WASP-71 and WASP-71b: Mpingo and Tanzanite (Mpingo is a tree that grows in southern Tanzania producing ebony wood for musical instruments, while Tanzanite is a precious stone).

WASP-72 and WASP-72b: Diya and Cuptor (Diya is an oil lamp used in the festival of Diwali in Mauritius, while Cuptor is a traditional clay oven).

WASP-79 and WASP-79b: Montuno and Pollera (the names are the traditional costumes worn by the man and the woman, respectively, in the El Punto folk dance of Panama).

WASP-80 and WASP-80b: Petra and Wadirum (Wadi Rum is a valley in southern Jordan while Petra is an ancient city).

WASP-161 and WASP-161b: Tislit and Isli (both are lakes in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, and also mean “bride” and “groom” in the Amazigh language).

The tidal shape of the exoplanet WASP-121b

The moon’s gravity causes a tidal bulge in Earth’s oceans, so that the water facing the moon is raised several metres. Similarly, close-orbiting exoplanets will have a tidally distorted shape, with a tidal bulge facing the host star. The amount of distortion can be quantified by the “Love number” h (named after the mathematician Augustus Love)

Specifically, h2 tells us the relative height of the tidal bulge, and would be zero for a perfectly rigid body that did not distort at all, and would be 2.5 for a perfectly fluid body that adapted fully to the tidal potential. Gas-giant planets have large envelopes of gaseous fluid, so would be expected to have fairly high values of h2. However, they also might have rocky or metallic cores, and so would have values less than 2.5. For example Jupiter has h2 = 1.6 while Saturn has h2 = 1.4.

Transit of WASP-121b observed by HST with a model fit by Hellard et al.

A new paper by Hugo Hellard et al discusses whether h2 for a hot-Jupiter exoplanet can be measured from the shape of the transit lightcurve, given good-enough photometry such as that from the Hubble Space Telescope.

The main problem is that the transit profile is heavily affected by variations in the brightness of the stellar disc, in particular the limb darkening (a star’s limbs appear a bit dimmer, because a tangential line-of-sight into a gas cloud skims only the cooler, upper layers). Thus the Hellard et al paper discusses at length different ways to model the limb darkening.

A star’s disk is dimmer at the edges, so a transiting exoplanet removes less light (here Venus, top right, is transiting the Sun).

The end-result, however, is a claim to have measured h2 for WASP-121b, with a value of h2 = 1.4 ± 0.8. This is not (yet) a strong constraint, but points to the potential in the future, and also flags up the need to understand and properly parametrise limb darkening.